Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

Careers in Law Enforcement, Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

Earnings Potential

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual earnings of probation officers and correctional treatment specialists in May 2004 were $39,600. The middle 50 percent earned between $31,500 and $52,100. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $26,310, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $66,660. In May 2004, median annual earnings for probation officers and correctional treatment specialists employed in State government were $39,810; those employed in local government earned $40,560. Higher wages tend to be found in urban areas.

Facts at a glance

  • State and local governments employ most workers.
  • A bachelor’s degree in social work, criminal justice, or a related field usually is required.
  • Employment growth, which is projected to be about as fast as average, depends on government funding.
  • Most probation officers and correctional treatment specialists work as trainees or on a probationary period for up to a year before being offered a permanent position

Summary of what this career entails

Government economists expect jobs for probation officers and correctional treatment specialists to grow as fast as the average for all occupations through 2014. Many openings will be created by the large number of workers expected to retire by 2014. This career is not attractive to some people due to relatively low earnings, heavy workloads, and high stress.

Examples and or details of work

Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists organizes medical, mental health, or substance abuse treatment services for those individuals who need it or if the court has ordered them. They can also present recommendations to the parole board to release inmates under parole and statutory release programs. Probation officers need to posses the ability to communicate information and ideas with others, speak clearly, have the ability to listen and understand, and the ability to tell when something is wrong or about to go wrong.

Degrees that lead to this career

Some of the degrees an individual can attain include:

  • B.S. in Social Work
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice
  • B.S. in Criminal Law
  • M.S. in Psychology
  • M.S. in Criminal Justice

Specific Career openings in this field

Some of the positions that can be available for individuals who want a career as probation officers and correctional treatment specialists include parole officers, probation officers, correctional officers, and pretrial officers.

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Police and Detectives, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos160.htm(visited October 30, 2006).

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos265.htm (visited October 31, 2006).

 

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