Business Management

Earnings Potential

Earnings of administrative services managers vary greatly depending on the employer, the specialty, and the geographic area. In general, however, median annual earnings of administrative services managers in May 2004 were $60,290. The middle 50 percent earned between $42,680 and $83,510. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $31,120, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $110,270.

Facts at a glance

  • Applicants will face keen competition because of the substantial supply of competent, experienced workers seeking managerial jobs.
  • Administrative services managers work throughout private industry and government and have a wide range of responsibilities, experience, earnings, and education.
  • Administrative services managers should be analytical, detail-oriented, flexible, decisive, and have good communication skills.

Summary of what this career entails

A business manager is involved in a diverse amount of activity, all having to do with the economy and all sectors of it. He/she coordinates and directs support services to organizations ranging from insurance companies, computer manufactures and government offices. The workers are in charge of services such as the management of payroll, travel and other administrative duties. The specific duties of a business manager depend on the degree of responsibility and authority. In smaller organizations, a business manager may oversee all administrative duties, in a bigger corporation, a first-line administrative service manager will report to a mid-level manager who reports to the owner of said corporation.

Examples and or details of work

Examples of things a business manager may have to do is travel across the country or even overseas to either make deals with other corporations or make sure his boss gets the best hotels while the boss makes the deals. A business manager must also be knowledgeable about finances. Possibly the most important thing, especially in a smaller organization, is that a business manager should be a good motivator, along the lines of Dallas Cowboys coach Bill Parcells. A business manager must have his employees believe in him and what the company is trying to accomplish or said employees won’t be motivated to perform well. Even in bigger corporations, often times the employees only answer to the business manager and never sees the true “head honcho”, so even in that case it is crucial that the employees believe in the goals of the corporation.

Degrees that lead to this career

Degrees that lead to a career in business management include business, management, human resources, finance, engineering, architecture, construction management, business administration, and faculty management. An individual already in the management field can advance by the attainment of the Certified Manager, a designation offered by the Institute of Certified Professional Managers. Qualification for individuals entering the business management field comes in the form of the Facility Management Professional credential.

Specific Career openings in this field

Specific careers in the field of business management include first-line administrative service manager, mid-level manager, top executive, faculty manager, industrial property manager, administrative officer, property disposal specialist, support service administrator, and management in federal and state government.

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Administrative Services Managers , on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos002.htm  

 

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